Eggstatic!


First of all: Shout out to my sister on her birthday today!!!!! 🙂

Wow…I have so much to blog about! Let’s start with something that I got in the mail the other day!!!!

I haven’t tried these out on the bike yet (they came with the clips, but not the pedals – what?!?!?), but as soon as I buy the pedals – which I may just buy a new set of clips/peds depending, I am trying these out! I’ll let you know how they work and such. AND….they fit like a glove! Perfecto! The jersey – same thing, I just didn’t get a picture. Soon, my friends.

This morning I boiled up some eggs for a *healthy* egg salad. What, you say? I know, egg salads are not the healthiest thing around, but I tell you this one is so good – and not as bad as you may think. So, first I’m going to tell you how to PROPERLY boil an egg – to perfection, my friends.

It’s usually the most simple kitchen tasks that get messed up because it’s so easy to ignore the importance of them, but that gray-green ring around the yolk of an over-cooked egg has got to be one of the most unsightly culinary mistakes out there. The reason this occurs is a reaction between the yolk and albumen as the egg cooks at high temperatures for too long, so preventing the ring (and that sulfurous smell that accompanies it) is pretty much as simple as not overcooking the eggs.

Overcooked eggs are harmless to eat, but they’re not particularly tasty – the whites are rubbery and the yolks are chalky. So, to boil an egg and retain a vivid yellow yolk encased in a delicate white, just follow these simple rules:

1. Start and end with cold water
You want to start your eggs covered with at least an inch of cold water and finish them by running under cold water. Gradually increasing the temperature of the water from cold to boiling is key to preventing the whites from becoming rubbery before the yolks have a chance to cook. It also reduces the chance of the shells cracking during cooking, as air trapped inside the shell can be released gradually, rather than as a burst of steam. Running them under cold water afterward halts the cooking process, which also prevents the whites from overcooking and being rubbery, as well as preventing that dreaded ring. Today, I also put some cold water in a bowl to set in the refrigerator while I prepared the other parts of the egg salad.

2. Season your cooking water
Add a small splash of vinegar and a pinch of salt to the water you are going to boil the eggs in. This has two effects. The first is that, if by chance an egg shell does accidentally crack, the protein will coagulate instead of seeping out and making a mess of the water. The second is that it slightly softens the shell of the egg, making it easier to peel later.

3. Use “old” eggs
This doesn’t actually make a difference as far as the cooking process goes, but eggs that are very fresh are more difficult to peel once cooked, which can affect their appearance if the shells do not come off cleanly. Try to use the older carton of eggs in your refrigerator when making boiled eggs because they will separate easier from their shells. In the case today, I knew I would be making these late last week when I made out my menu plan, so I bought my eggs well in advance.

4. Use a timer
Once you bring the water to a boil over high heat, cover the pan, turn off the heat and start the timer for 15 minutes. After 15 minutes, drain the water and transfer the eggs to an ice bath or run under cold water until cool, to prevent overcooking.

That’s it. If you start large eggs over high heat, covered with an inch of cold water seasoned with salt and vinegar, and turn off the heat when they come to the boil, cover and let sit for 15 minutes in the hot water, then run the eggs under cold water until cooled, you have perfectly cooked hard boiled eggs every time.

The finished product:
Perfectly boiled eggs. Yumm-o!

I boiled 11 eggs (I know, odd number – I needed to leave 6 for another project). I used 7 eggs in my egg salad recipe. And here is the recipe – this one is so good! I love cold egg salad during those hot summer days.

Ingredients:
7 hard-boiled eggs, peeled
1/2 cup light mayonnaise
1-1/2 tablespoon Dijon mustard
3/4 cup chopped celery
1/2 cup thinly sliced green onions
1 teaspoon chopped fresh tarragon

*Note* I like less mayonnaise (I don’t like the taste of it very much) and more mustard, so feel free to adapt this recipe if needed to suit your own taste.

Procedures:

Cut eggs lengthwise in half. Remove yolks from 3 eggs and reserve for another use. Cut remaining egg yolks and all whites into 1/2-inch pieces.
Whisk mayonnaise and mustard in medium bowl to blend. Add chopped eggs, celery, green onions, and tarragon. Stir gently to blend. Season egg salad to taste with salt and pepper. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.

Look what I picked up at the store!

I’ve been eating these like candy.

So, for my lunch today I had some leftover salad with balsamic vinegar, cottage cheese, berries, and egg salad on 1 slice of Earthgrains thin bun (toasted – just how I like it!).

Check out this salad (picture is from when I made it yesterday – it was so good!)

My lunch plate:

I normally like a slice of tomato with my egg salad, but just forgot about it – I guess I was too hungry to care! Next time…

Micah got back a while ago from class. We really don’t have many weekend plans, but I’m thinking a picnic is in store! Also going to spend some time on my bike and also some running. Catch you later!

Do you have any fun plans for the weekend?

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3 responses to “Eggstatic!

  1. ooohhh I get so hungry reading your posts. Since you can’t find a job with music, maybe you should consider being a personal chef…like mine!

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